EEA Working Groups collaborate to develop open, standards based-specifications to accelerate the acceptance and deployment of Enterprise Ethereum blockchain solutions within the global marketplace. These groups ensure that deliverables developed by the EEA and the specific industry requirements developed by the EEA Interest Groups are prepared properly for inclusion in specification development.

The Technical Working Groups can create task forces to focus on specialized areas and may produce specifications, or may determine how to use existing standards to resolve problems. One example is the Off-chain Trusted Computing working group, which has developed the EEA Trusted Compute specification and continues to refine it for inclusion in the main client specification at an appropriate stage. The Technical Working Groups provide support to help EEA members understand what they need, and provide a focal contact point for the broader community to make requests or ask questions.

The Core Specification Working Group (CSWG) continues the evolution of the EEA specification, by creating standards for enterprise Ethereum deployment that meets client needs, and ensures quality implementation and interoperability in permission networks. The CSWG address requests from EEA member, who want specifications that are compatible with as many Ethereum mainnet components as possible to minimize customization and maintenance costs.

Working Group Leadership

Client Interoperability Testing

This group provides EEA members with the ability to easily test applications on a conformant EEA Permissioned Blockchain. This enables developers in any part of the ecosystem to perform experiments on different aspects of Enterprise Ethereum blockchains and identify any interoperability bugs or gaps in how the ecosystem currently supports enterprise use cases. The EEA Testing Working Group develops testnets to demonstrate that implementations conform to the EEA specifications and allow EEA members to test new applications.

Name

Role

Company

Email

Antoine Toulmé Chair The Machine Consultancy LLC [email protected]

Core Specifications

The work of the group is to answer the question “What is Enterprise Ethereum?”, defining what is required to be an Enterprise Ethereum Client and an Enterprise Ethereum Permissioned Blockchain. The specifications developed by this group are intended to enable multiple stakeholders to build interoperable software that can be used to run Enterprise Ethereum Permissioned Blockchains.

Name

Role

Company

Email

Przemek Siemion Co-Chair Banco Santander SA [email protected]
Adam Clarke Co-Chair Fnality International [email protected]

Cross-Chain Interoperability

The Cross Chain Interoperability Working Group is focused on enabling code and nodes on a blockchain to call code deployed on a different blockchain, and where appropriate, receive a response. The EEA members in this group are interested in developing a standard for an interoperable specification.

Name

Role

Company

Email

Weijia Zhang Co-Chair Wanchain [email protected]
Peter Robinson Co-Chair PegaSys-ConsenSys [email protected]

EthTrust Security Levels

EthTrust seeks to solve the problem of trust in Ethereum transactions. The smart contracts that power Ethereum have been fraught with security issues and today there is still no good way to see how secure an address or contract is before initiating a transaction. EEA members in this group are looking to improve the smart contract security standard and registry system created by the EthTrust project to raise the level of confidence and trust in Ethereum as a global settlement layer for all types of transactions across all types of industry sectors.

Name

Role

Company

Email

Chris Cordi Chair Splunk [email protected]

Offchain/Trusted Execution

This group is developing materials that describe the existing ecosystem of secure computing approaches for Enterprise Ethereum use cases and identifying potential technology gaps. EEA members are also involved in maintaining EEA’s existing offchain/trusted compute 1.1 specification and develop new methods to provide secure computing.

Name

Role

Company

Email

Jean Charles Cabelguen Chair Independent Member [email protected]

EEA Authority to Operate

Companies seeking to work with the U.S. Federal Government in any capacity are required to meet their strict cybersecurity standards. To this end, the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) requires an Authority to Operate (ATO) security authorization process. Achieving this authorization means ensuring compliance with requirements determined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), among other security aspects. EEA’s ATO Working Group is focused on developing Ethereum-based NIST-compliant solutions that can go through the ATO process and be approved for use by US Federal Government organizations.

Name

Role

Company

Email

John Greaves Chair Consensys Health [email protected]